Weekly Bulletin

Nov 22nd -Nov 28th

Nov 28th: 24th Sunday After Pentecost






Ven. Savvas the Sanctified

Saint Savva the Sanctified was born in the fifth century at Cappadocia of pious Christian parents, John and Sophia. His father was a military commander. Journeying to Alexandria on military matters, John and Sophia left their five-year-old son Savva in the care of an uncle. When the boy reached eight years of age, he entered the monastery of Saint Flavian located nearby. The gifted child quickly learned to read and became an expert on the Holy Scriptures. In vain did his parents urge Saint Savva to return to the world and enter into marriage. When he was seventeen years old he received monastic tonsure, and attained such perfection in fasting and prayer that he was given the gift of wonderworking.

After spending ten years at the monastery of Saint Flavian, he went to Jerusalem, and from there to the monastery of Saint Euthymius the Great (January 20). But Saint Euthymius sent Saint Savva to Abba Theoctistus, the head of a nearby monastery with a strict cenobitic rule. Saint Savva lived in obedience at this monastery until the age of thirty. After the death of the Elder Theoctistus, his successor blessed Saint Savva to seclude himself in a cave. On Saturdays, however, he left his hermitage and came to the monastery, where he participated in divine services and ate with the brethren. After a certain time Saint Savva received permission not to leave his hermitage at all, and he struggled in the cave for five years.

Saint Euthymius attentively directed the life of the young monk, and seeing his spiritual maturity, he began to take him to the Rouba wilderness with him. They set out on January 14, and remained there until Palm Sunday. Saint Euthymius called Saint Savva a child-elder, and encouraged him to grow in the monastic virtues.

When Saint Euthymius fell asleep in the Lord (+ 473), Saint Savva withdrew from the Lavra and moved to a cave near the monastery of Saint Gerasimus of Jordan (March 4). After several years, disciples began to gather around Saint Savva, seeking the monastic life. As the number of monks increased, a lavra sprang up. When a pillar of fire appeared before Saint Savva as he was walking, he found a spacious cave in the form of a church.

Saint Savva founded several more monasteries. Many miracles took place through the prayers of Saint Savva: at the Lavra a spring of water welled up, during a time of drought there was abundant rain, and there were also healings of the sick and the demoniacs. Saint Savva composed the first monastic Rule of church services, the so-called “Jerusalem Typikon”, accepted by all the Palestine monasteries. The saint surrendered his soul to God in the year 532.


Weekly Services:

Saturday, Nov 27th @5pm- Vespers

Sunday, Nov 28th @10am- Divine Liturgy

Announcements:

1.) Book Club: We will be meeting on Zoom on Sundays at 6:00 pm. The Zoom link will be sent Sunday afternoon. Please keep suggestions for new books coming!


2.) Parish Council Nominations for 2022: It's time to send in your nominations for the 2022 Parish Council! The following positions are open: Secretary, Assistant Warden and Treasurer.


Volunteering:


1.) The Food Cupboard: We are still collecting personal hygiene items for this organization, to include: toothpaste, toothbrushes, deodorant, mouthwash, shampoo, etc. Please bring any items you can donate to church and place in the bin in the foyer.


2.) Open Door Mission: This organization is looking for donations of men's socks. If you are able to donate, there will be a bin in the foyer.


Prayer Requests

Bonita H. Petr C.

Birthdays:

Jessica R. (11/24), Mariaim B. (11/27)


Anniversaries:

Grant, O Lord, a prosperous and peaceful life, health, salvation, and furtherance in all good things, unto Thy servants Jessica and Mariami who are celebrating their birthdays, and preserve them O Lord for many years!


Epistle Reading: Ephesians 2:14-22

14 For he himself is our peace, who has made the two groups one and has destroyed the barrier, the dividing wall of hostility, 15 by setting aside in his flesh the law with its commands and regulations. His purpose was to create in himself one new humanity out of the two, thus making peace, 16 and in one body to reconcile both of them to God through the cross, by which he put to death their hostility. 17 He came and preached peace to you who were far away and peace to those who were near. 18 For through him we both have access to the Father by one Spirit. 19 Consequently, you are no longer foreigners and strangers, but fellow citizens with God’s people and also members of his household, 20 built on the foundation of the apostles and prophets, with Christ Jesus himself as the chief cornerstone. 21 In him the whole building is joined together and rises to become a holy temple in the Lord. 22 And in him you too are being built together to become a dwelling in which God lives by his Spirit.



Gospel Reading: Luke 17:12-19

12 As he was going into a village, ten men who had leprosy met him. They stood at a distance 13 and called out in a loud voice, “Jesus, Master, have pity on us!” 14 When he saw them, he said, “Go, show yourselves to the priests.” And as they went, they were cleansed.

15 One of them, when he saw he was healed, came back, praising God in a loud voice.16 He threw himself at Jesus’ feet and thanked him—and he was a Samaritan. 17 Jesus asked, “Were not all ten cleansed? Where are the other nine? 18 Has no one returned to give praise to God except this foreigner?” 19 Then he said to him, “Rise and go; your faith has made you well.”